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Adarsh Kumar Kakar, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of CIS

AdarshAfter 3 decades of work experience with top software development companies in India, Adarsh completed his Ph.D. in Management Information Systems from the University of Alabama at the age of 57 years. His work experience includes working as a programmer, systems engineer, project manager and profit-center head. He has assessed IT/ MIS departments of world-class organizations including British Airways, SAMBA (Saudi American Bank), Tata Chemicals and Tata Motors.

Currently employed as Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems at Alabama State University, he strives to share his varied experience for the benefit of his students.

He is actively involved in research in the area of software product development. His research has won awards at conferences and resulted in publication of more than a dozen articles in the past 5 years in well-respected journals such as Computers in Human Behavior, Interacting with Computers, Journal of Computer Information Systems and Information Systems Management. His work is multidisciplinary in nature building on existing knowledge from software engineering, organization studies, psychology, product management and consumer behavior disciplines.  

Some of Dr. Kakar's quality publications are listed below.

  1. Kakar, A. K. (2015). Software Product Features: Should We Focus on the Attractive or the Important? Journal of Decision Systems, Vol. 24, Issue 4, 2015 [ABS-1 and ASU-3]
  2. Kakar, A. K. (2015). Why do users speak more positively about Mac OS X but are more loyal to Windows 7? Computers in Human Behavior, 44, 166-173. [ABS-3 and ASU-5]
  3. Kakar, A. K. (2015). Investigating the penalty reward calculus of software users and its impact on requirements prioritization. Information and Software Technology, 65, 56-68. [ABS-not listed -Elsevier and ASU-3]
  4. Kakar, A. K. (2016). A User-Centric Typology of Information System Requirements. Journal of Organizational and End User Computing, 28(1), 34-59. [ABS-1 and ASU-3]
  5. Kakar, A. K. (2016). Separating the Wheat from the Chaff: Extracting Business Value from Feature Requests Posted in User Forums. Journal of Organizational and End User Computing (28:2), pp. 125-149. [ABS-1 and ASU-3].
  6. Kakar, A. K. (2016). Do Reflexive Software Development Teams Perform Better? Business & Information Systems Engineering (accepted). [ABS-2 and ASU-4]
  7. Kakar, A. K. (2016). Assessing Self-Organization in Software Development Teams. Journal of Computer Information Systems (accepted). [ABS-2 and ASU-4]
  8. Kakar, A. K. (2016) "Software Feature Life Cycles: Insights From a Value-Based Typology of Software Feature Innovation." Interacting with Computers (published online) [ABS-2 and ASU-4].
  9. Kakar, A. K. (2016). Enhancing Reflexivity in Software Development Teams: Should We Focus on Autonomy or Interdependence?. Journal of Information Technology Theory and Application (JITTA), 17(3), 2. [ABS-1 and ASU-3]
  10. Kakar, A. K. (2016). Why won’t Google users switch to Bing? Understanding factors that promote and barriers that prevent software users from switching. Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation, 19(3), 180-196 [ABS-1 and ASU-3]
  11. Kakar, A. K. (2017) "Investigating the Prevalence and Performance Correlates of Vertical versus Shared Leadership in Emergent Software Development Teams." Information Systems Management.  [ABS-2 and ASU-4]
  12. Kakar, A. K. (2016). Can we Take User Responses at Face Value? Exploring Users’“Self-stated” and “Derived” Importance of Utilitarian versus Hedonic Software Features. AIS Transactions on Human-Computer Interaction, 8(4), 131-148. [ABS-1 and ASU-3]
  13. A. K. Kakar, “Investigating the relationships between the use contexts, user perceived values and loyalty to a software product,” ACM Transactions on Management Information Systems  [ABS-Not Listed and ASU-3].

[Association of Business Schools’ Academic Journal Guide ranks business related journals on a 4-point scale with 4 being the top-rated].

The research conducted by Dr. Kakar has received numerous accolades, some of which are listed below:

1. Kakar, A. K. (2017) "Investigating the Prevalence and Performance Correlates of Vertical versus Shared Leadership in Emergent Software Development Teams." Information Systems Management. Published online. [ABS-2 and ASU-4]
Reviewer 1: “This paper creates a pause in the conversation by examining and testing what we know about leadership styles in software development scenarios. Provides several implications for practitioners, many of which contain actionable guidance.  Particularly valuable are implications which highlight the need for more of this kind of research based on the global nature of our work, leading to more virtual teams. This paper has the potential to be a sounding bell rather than viewed as a lesser exercise. ” Anonymous reviewer
Reviewer 2: “Many thanks for offering me the chance to read this interesting manuscript. I believe that the targeted contribution of your manuscript is very relevant.” Anonymous Reviewer
: “Overall, this study examined relevant and important issue with interesting findings and presents good potential to contribute in academia and practice.  The reviewers clearly recognized such academic and practical values.”
Special Issue Editor
2. Kakar, A. K. (2016). Can we Take User Responses at Face Value? Exploring Users’“Self-stated” and “Derived” Importance of Utilitarian versus Hedonic Software Features. AIS Transactions on Human-Computer Interaction, 8(4), 131-148.
 “It is a pleasure to conditionally "desk-accept" your manuscript entitled "Can we take User Responses at Face Value? Exploring Users’ “Self-Stated” and “Derived” Importance of Utilitarian versus Hedonic Software Features" for publication in the AIS Transactions on Human-Computer Interaction. I believe that this paper provides an important, missing element to our literature, and congratulate the authors for a rare desk-acceptance.” Editor In Chief
3. A. K. Kakar, “Investigating the relationships between the use contexts, user perceived values and loyalty to a software product,” ACM Transactions on Management Information Systems 
“Although the studies on software products values are numerous, this study focuses on the moderating effect of use needs and primary use. I think these two variables are very interesting and the findings could contribute the understanding of software value. The paper is well written and I enjoyed reading it.” Anonymous Reviewer 
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