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Monuments

Alabama State University’s campus features a number of historic and unique monuments that have become iconic images of the University’s past, present and future. Learn more:

Equinox (1974)
Located in the center of the T-shaped lawn at the heart of the ASU campus, the Equinox is one of our most popular landmarks. Erected in 1974, the Equinox is a massive outdoor sculpture that pays tribute to African-Americans’ contributions to our nation’s development. The monument is one of the few pieces of massive outdoor sculpture in Montgomery, Ala.

Bell Tower (1928)
The Bell Tower is one of the most prominent symbols of ASU. The landmark sits atop the University’s Oldest Dormitory, Bibb Graves Hall, and can be seen from the distance as visitors approach the main entrance to campus. The Bell Tower appears on the official ASU seal and is known for the sounds of its bell chimes which mark the hour of day and special occasions on campus.

Memorial Bell
The Memorial Bell, located in the plaza between the Academic Mall and the Levi Watkins Learning Center, dates back to the 1880s when ASU’s predecessor, the Lincoln Normal School, was located in Marion, Ala. During its days in Marion and its early days in Montgomery, the bell tolled to signal the change of classes. Lore has it that the ringing of the bell was so reliable that it eventually became recognized as a timepiece for the neighborhoods surrounding the University. Each February, the bell is unlocked and rings in the university’s Founder’s Day celebration; it tolls when a new president is inaugurated; and its chimes mark the annual commencement services.

Rosa Parks Monument
A monument to the mother of the modern civil rights movement, Rosa L. Parks, stands near the main entrance to Alabama State University as a tribute to Parks’ sacrifice for human rights and in honor of the many members of the ASU family who played a significant role in the Civil Rights Movement. Inscribed at the base of the monument is a poignant message that reminds us all of the responsibility we all share in carrying forward the legacy of those who came before us: “She sat down so we could stand up.”

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